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Thursday, 7 June 2018

Movie: Jurassic World – Fallen Kingdom

Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom” is the sequel to “Jurassic World,” Colin Trevorrow’s 2015 reboot of the “Jurassic Park” franchise. Chris Pratt and Bryce Dallas Howard reprise their roles as Owen and Claire, and Jeff Goldblum’s return as Ian Malcolm from the original film.




“These creatures were here before us,” Goldblum says in the new footage. “And if we’re not careful, they’re gonna be here after us.”
Three years after all hell broke loose on little Isla Nublar, a newly active volcano is threatening to consume the surviving dinosaurs there. In America, activists push for a rescue mission: Having brought these species back to life, they argue, mankind owes them some kind of debt. A committee of lawmakers hears from an expert witness, whose advice boils down to “the genie’s out of the bottle, folks,” or, perhaps, “life will find a way.” Yep, that would be Jeff Goldblum’s Dr. Ian Malcolm, whose involvement in the film is limited to just this one bit of testimony — but whose lines may be teasing a bigger role next time around.
The ringleader of the save-the-dinos campaign is someone with plenty of reason to see them re-extincted: Bryce Dallas Howard’s Claire Dearing, who nearly died every five minutes or so during the final hours of the park she used to run. Introducing her character with a shot that begins on her footwear and inches up, Bayona gets a laugh out of Jurassic World’s biggest idiocy: This time around, Claire will leave the high heels in the office and wear sturdy knee boots when it’s time to run through the jungle.
Claire is summoned by gazillionaire Benjamin Lockwood (James Cromwell), who we learn was John Hammond’s partner in reviving extinct species before the latter split off and started the first Jurassic Park. Near death, Lockwood wants to set things right for the animals he helped create: He has located a pristine island that will be suitable as a tourist-free refuge, and wants Claire’s help getting as many animals as possible relocated there before Isla Nublar goes kablooey. Naturally, the mission will need the special talents of Chris Pratt’s Owen Grady, who has been off hand-building a cabin in the mountains since his affair with Claire ran out of steam.

Pratt downplays the cowboy charisma that helped make the human side of Jurassic World tolerable, but Owen remains cocksure enough to set the tone for developments to come: When, after arriving on Isla Nublar, the two realize there’s a plan afoot to steal dinosaurs and sell them for all sorts of nefarious purposes, Claire and Owen must sneak into and sabotage the effort much like Indy did with those Nazi submarines in Raiders of the Lost Ark.
The mass evacuation leads them to a secret dino zoo on the American mainland, where mad scientists are holding that smaller-meaner beastie hinted at in Jurassic World: The Indoraptor, which gets genes from both that film’s Indominus Rex and the nightmare-maker who starred in the series’ first outing and most of its best moments since: the Velociraptor.

(About that auction: The screenwriters don’t seem to grasp the economics of a world ruled by the megarich. When a stainless-steel tchotchke by Jeff Koons can sell for almost $60 million, no auctioneer worth his haughty accent would allow a last-of-its-kind prehistoric monster to go for less than half that. As one baddie brags early on about being able to sell a specimen for $4 million, we snicker and recall Dr. Evil’s underwhelming “one million dollars!” ultimatum. Does he think that’s a lot of money for a dinosaur?)
Working with his usual DP, Oscar Faura, Bayona finds many opportunities to transform action beats into memorably beautiful visions. Trapped on the edge of the dying Isla Nublar, for instance, a magnificent lone animal — what are we supposed to call Brontosauruses these days? — rears on its hind legs as it’s engulfed in smoke and flame. In his many decades onscreen, Godzilla has rarely had such an operatic showcase. And reteaming with editor Bernat Vilaplana (who has worked often with both Bayona and Guillermo del Toro), the director ensures that the enchanting images don’t derail the picture’s intensifying action pace.
While the movie courses seamlessly through different modes, it remains old-fashioned in its treatment of Howard’s character, who mostly screams and runs while Owen gets things done. Claire has grown up a lot since her debut as Jurassic World’s soulless corporate climber, but she remains a damsel in distress who (this time, as last) gets to perform a single far-fetched heroic feat when things are at their most dire.

Fallen Kingdom ends with an act that is just about impossible to believe outside the context of a fiction that, like DNA, is driven solely by the need to replicate itself. This is said to be the second film in a trilogy. But Fallen Kingdom’s closing scenes seem intent on something far bigger, like a Planet of the Apes-style saga that has barely begun. You don’t remake reality in a film’s final frames without intending to milk things for as long as the public will keep buying tickets. If future instalments are this rich and exciting, that’s probably going to be a while.
Perhaps the most frustrating aspect of all is the way the film ends, by clearly telegraphing the setup for the third Jurassic World, which already has a 2021 release date. But this movie crosses certain boundaries in a way that can’t be undone, and if audiences don’t like where things are headed at the end of this film, they aren’t likely to have those concerns addressed in the next instalment.
Production companies: Universal Pictures, Amblin Entertainment
Distributor: Universal
Cast: Chris Pratt, Bryce Dallas Howard, Isabella Sermon, Rafe Spall, Justice Smith, Daniella Pineda, James Cromwell, Toby Jones, Ted Levine, B.D. Wong, Geraldine Chaplin, Jeff Goldblum
Director: J.A. Bayona
Screenwriters: Derek Connolly, Colin Trevorrow
Producers: Frank Marshall, Patrick Crowley, Belen Atienza
Executive producers: Steven Spielberg, Colin Trevorrow
Director of photography: Oscar Faura
Production designer: Andy Nicholson
Costume designer: Sammy Sheldon
Editor: Bernat Vilaplana
Composer: Michael Giacchino
Casting: Nina Gold

Monday, 4 June 2018

News: Malaysia’s Biggest 24-Hour Bookstore


BookXcess, the owner of a chain of bookshop and organiser of the Big Bad Wolf (BBW) book festival, made history when it launched the first 24-hour bookshop in the country.

Located at the scenic Tamarind Square, the new BookXcess branch is believed to be the largest in the country, covering a massive area of 37,000 sq ft. Over 500,000 books on numerous topics, with discount rates of between 50 and 80 per cent which are lower than the market price, are being offered.

Its chief product officer, Yujeen Chua, said with the opening of the outlet last Tuesday they hoped to attract people from various walks of life, especially university students in Cyberjaya, Putrajaya and nearby areas.

“The scenic landscape was chosen to provide a haven for readers to escape from the hustle bustle of the city and gain inspiration.
“Although located far from the Klang Valley area, the low prices are expected to attract book lovers from the Klang Valley, Selangor, Negeri Sembilan and Melaka,” he said at the launch of the outlet.
The bookshop with free WiFi access also has a cafe and provides space for customers to work, read, as well as conduct arts and craft classes and colouring contests.

BookXcess, which first opened its outlet in Amcorp Mall in 2006, now has stands out proudly with seven branches in shopping malls such as Starling Mall in Damansara, Fahrenheit 88 (Bukit Bintang) and 1Utama (Petaling Jaya).